Teen Suicidal Ideations

Teenagers in middle school and high school experience tremendous changes: physically, psychologically, and emotionally. This is due to the exponential pace of development. In addition, many teenagers miss out on crucial developmental stages, leading to a sense of disappointment and emotional pain.

The upshot of this is that suicide is now the second biggest cause of mortality among teenagers. Teen suicide has a colossal impact in Southern California, where teenagers now nurse suicidal ideas and commit suicide more often. Consequently, it’s crucial to figure out what circumstances might make suicidal thoughts more likely in teens.

Teen Suicidal Ideations

Teenagers in middle school and high school experience tremendous changes: physically, psychologically, and emotionally. This is due to the exponential pace of development. In addition, many teenagers miss out on crucial developmental stages, leading to a sense of disappointment and emotional pain.

The upshot of this is that suicide is now the second biggest cause of mortality among teenagers. Teen suicide has a colossal impact in Southern California, where teenagers now nurse suicidal ideas and commit suicide more often. Consequently, it’s crucial to figure out what circumstances might make suicidal thoughts more likely in teens.

What is Suicidal Ideation?

Suicidal ideation is when someone contemplates ending their own life. The ideas might not even contain a suicide plot, but the motive is already present.

You’ve undoubtedly heard the term “suicidal ideations,” which refers to the actual act of having suicidal thoughts. Even among individuals who have suicidal thoughts, not everyone follows through. As a rule of thumb, you should consult a doctor as soon as you notice any symptoms in a teenager you care about.

Types of Suicidal Ideation

According to professionals in mental health and the growth of adolescents, suicidal thoughts may either be active or passive. Here are the differences between both:

Passive Suicidal Ideation

A teenager with passive suicidal thoughts has no intention of attempting suicide, no methods of committing suicide, and no timeframe in which to attempt suicide. “…indifference to an unintended death that might occur if no actions are made to protect one’s own life” sums up passive suicidal thoughts.

Active Suicidal Ideation

An active suicidal teen has a strategy for suicide, a means of suicide, and a deadline for their plan to be carried out. An individual’s expectation that their attempt will result in death is the most important consideration when determining whether or not they are engaging in active suicidal ideation. Active suicidal ideation must be a deliberate desire to inflict harm and the expectation that the suicidal attempt will have a permanent outcome.

The Difference Between Active and Passive Suicidal Ideations

It is essential to know the distinction between active and passive suicidal thoughts since treatment arrangements can be made for each kind of suicidal behavior. Teenagers with active suicidal thoughts may not need the same treatment as those suffering from passive suicidal ideation. Psychiatrists establish the substance of a teen’s treatment plan for suicidal thoughts that are either passive or aggressive. Teens contemplating suicide need to be treated by a mental health expert with their parents’ involvement.

Passive suicidal ideation is characterized by a desire to commit suicide but no concrete plans or resources. In contrast, active suicidal ideation is marked by the existence of a suicide execution plan and the ability to carry it out, or at least the knowledge of how to do so.

Symptoms of Suicidal Ideations

These signs and symptoms may indicate suicidal ideation or suicidal thoughts:

  • severing ties with others
  • talking about being a burden to other people
  • psychomotor agitation, such as pacing or hand-wringing
  • farewells that are spoken with the sincerity of a last goodbye
  • being unable to enjoy previously enjoyable activities such as eating, exercising, socializing, or engaging in sex
  • expressing deep sadness and condemnation of oneself
  • bringing up suicide or death in discussions
  • having a sense or a perception of hopelessness
  • severe emotional pain
  • obsessive focus on violence, deaths
  • Frequent mood swings, whether happy or sad
  • discussion of guilt, shame, or retribution.
  • having a high degree of agitation or anxiety
  • noticing a shift in personality, routine, or sleeping patterns
  • increasing the use of illicit drugs or alcohol
  • reckless conduct, such as drunken driving or drug use
  • taking care of their affairs and donating their belongings
  • having access to a weapon or chemicals that might terminate a person’s life
  • depression, panic attacks, or a hard time focusing
  • showing discontent with their existence or birth

Many teens with suicidal thoughts and sentiments keep their feelings and ideas secret and don’t exhibit any symptoms of anything being amiss. Because of this, spotting signs might be a little tricky at times.

Treatment Options for Teens with Suicidal Ideations

If you are concerned about your teen’s suicide thoughts and intents, an examination, diagnosis, and treatment at a mental health institution may be the best course of action. In the long run, getting professional advice will benefit you and your family. At assessment centers, teens and their families are encouraged to engage in the process of developing treatment programs, where everyone’s participation is respected. Psychotherapy must be included in treatment programs since many teens are unaware of their triggers or underestimate the impact their emotions and behaviors may have on their interpersonal relationships. They must understand how you want to assist them and that you are not acting alone.

Furthermore, assessment centers assist teenagers in identifying personal goals they want to pursue and offer coping strategies to help them achieve these goals. It may be difficult to encourage them to open up at times, but it is critical to validate their feelings and inform them that suicide is not a viable option, no matter how appealing it seems. In most cases, specialists recommend the following teen treatment options:

Psychotherapy

In psychotherapy or talk therapy, teens work with a therapist to discover why they’re suicidal and how to deal with their feelings of depression.

Family counseling and educational programs

Associating with other family members throughout therapy might help them better comprehend the teenager’s experience and recognize early signs of trouble.

Treatment for drug addiction problems

Drug and Alcohol Abuse triggers weird feelings like committing suicide in teenagers. However, they think less of committing suicide as they withdraw gradually from using.

Lifestyle Changes

Stress management, improved sleep, eating, and exercise habits, creating a strong support network, and finding time for hobbies and interests are all examples of lifestyle changes that help shift suicidal ideations away.

Medications

This includes treatment for any underlying depression triggering your suicidal thoughts. Such drugs include antidepressants, antipsychotic meds, and anti-anxiety medications.

The Role of Parents in Helping Teens with Suicidal Ideations

If your teen has suicidal thoughts, whether active or passive, you need to take particular actions as a parent. Suicidal thoughts in your adolescent must be addressed immediately as a parent or guardian in Southern California by doing the following:

Speak With Them

Discuss your worries, and then listen more than you talk. Pay attention to what they say without interruption. Don’t judge them. When speaking, keep your cool and control your demeanor well. Avoid contributing to the situation’s emotionality at all costs. Accept and acknowledge their emotions. Also, assure them you’ll be there for them at all times.

Obtain a Professional Assessment

By making an appointment for an evaluation or assessment, your teenager may benefit from the services offered by a knowledgeable mental health specialist. According to some experts, your adolescent’s thoughts of suicide may have been sparked either by a preexisting mental disorder or by a specific source of acute stress.

Depression Treatment for Teens in Southern California

The mental health specialists at Hillside Horizons for Teens can help you find the appropriate solution for your teen in Southern California: residential treatment, partial hospitalization, intensive outpatient, or outpatient therapy.